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  • More from the fun guy
    by David on June 11, 2021 at 2:43 pm

    Great fleas have little fleas upon their backs to bite ’em, And little fleas have lesser fleas, and so ad infinitum. Augustus de Morgan’s quote from A Budget of Paradoxes (1872) really means that everything is preyed upon by something, which in turn has something preying on it. As a virologist I’m well aware of The post More from the fun guy appeared first on The Apiarist.

  • Supering
    by David on June 4, 2021 at 2:25 pm

    Something short and sweet this week … though perhaps ‘tall and sweet’ would be preferable as I’m going to discuss supering. The noun supering means ‘the action or practice of fitting a super to a beehive’ and dates back to 1840: Duncan, James. Natural History of Bees Naturalist’s Library VoI. 223   The empty story which is added, The post Supering appeared first on The Apiarist.

  • Radar love
    by David on May 28, 2021 at 2:01 pm

    The average beefarmer in the UK is probably somewhere in their mid-60’s . This means that in 1973, when the Dutch rock band Golden Earring had their only notable chart success Radar love, they were about 18. Bear with me … As 18 year olds they probably wore denim flares and loud shirts with spearpoint The post Radar love appeared first on The Apiarist.

  • Hard graft
    by David on May 21, 2021 at 2:15 pm

    Regular readers will have seen this image before … … as I used it (with the same legend) towards the end of the post last week.  I spoke too soon 🙁 The temperature on the 17th and 18th briefly reached 17.5°C … which was enough. But I’m getting ahead of myself. Good morning America Glenrothes The post Hard graft appeared first on The Apiarist.

  • It’s a drone’s life
    by David on May 14, 2021 at 2:21 pm

    What has a mother but no father, but has both a grandmother and grandfather? If you’ve not seen this question before you’ve not attended a ‘mead and mince pies’ Christmas quiz at a beekeeping association.  The answer of course is a drone. The male honey bee. Drones are produced from unfertilised eggs laid by the The post It’s a drone’s life appeared first on The Apiarist.

  • Water %
    by invalid@example.com (BugsInABox) on June 16, 2021 at 12:52 pm

    Can anyone recommend a good value refractometer please? Regards Neil

  • How much syrup for new swarm?
    by invalid@example.com (Do224) on June 16, 2021 at 12:45 pm

    I gave my new swarm a litre of 1:1 syrup yesterday morning (48 hours after capture). Should I be giving them some more? They have a full brood box of new foundation to draw out.

  • What did you do in the Apiary today?
    by invalid@example.com (tonybloke) on June 16, 2021 at 12:44 pm

    the title says it all I applied some fondant to one of my colonies

  • Swarm taking over an occupied nuc
    by invalid@example.com (B+.) on June 16, 2021 at 12:42 pm

    OK. I should say up-front that I would be sceptical if I read this, but I was in the apiary and watched it happen myself. On Sunday evening ~6pm a swarm came in. It alighted on one of my mating hives (which are Paynes Langstroth polynucs – big enough to be almost a hive in itself). This polynuc contained a nucleus of 1-2 frames of brood and a frame of stores and a few empty combs -as I would normally do). I knew it had a marked virgin in because I had introduced her only a couple of days…Swarm taking over an occupied nuc

  • Aggressive swarm(s)
    by invalid@example.com (Julian4983) on June 16, 2021 at 12:41 pm

    I’ve been really lucky to start my beekeeping life with two ‘wild’ swarms that I received in late May. Both swarms are doing well and putting down brood and honey and have nearly filled their brood boxes … I’m delighted. The only drawback is that these bees are really aggressive and despite smoking and cloth covering they seem determined to ‘have a go’ each week I open their boxes to inspect. It’s really in contrast to my neighbours bees where both his native swarms and Italian imports…Aggressive swarm(s)

  • Honey jars
    by invalid@example.com (tomtit) on June 16, 2021 at 12:41 pm

    Hi Can any one recommend a supplier for honey jars

Honey Bee Suite A Better Way to Bee

  • What does terroir have to do with honey?
    by Rusty on June 9, 2021 at 3:31 pm

    I seldom switch allegiance midstream, but I just did. I set out to write about the terroir of honey, but as I read stacks of material on artisanal crops, a nagging thought kept doubling back. In… [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more. ]]

  • Bearly there: the remains of my apiary
    by Rusty on May 30, 2021 at 10:47 pm

    I always knew it would happen someday, and someday finally came. For twenty years my apiary has been in the same place, scattered along the trails that lead toward the Capitol State Forest. Just a… [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more. ]]

  • What is ethical beekeeping and why should we care?
    by Rusty on May 8, 2021 at 5:27 pm

    My friend Harry keeps bees in a bustling midwest metropolis where he harvests bumper crops of thick and luscious clover honey. The honey is so popular with local consumers, he can command any price…. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more. ]]

  • The perils of sugar syrup: it’s not that complicated
    by Rusty on April 15, 2021 at 10:12 pm

    After fielding beekeeper questions for eleven years, I have a decent idea of what confuses beginners. When it comes to puzzlement, nothing beats the perils of sugar syrup. Questions such as “How do I… [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more. ]]

  • Swarm traps won’t cause your bees to swarm
    by Rusty on April 3, 2021 at 6:51 pm

    New beekeepers often wonder if swarm traps or swarm lures installed near their apiary will cause their bees to swarm. The answer is an unequivocal “No.” This is not something you should worry about…. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more. ]]

  • Beacon Schools
    on June 15, 2021 at 9:28 am

    BBKA Beacon Schools Mission Statement BBKA Beacon School status is awarded to those schools who demonstrate sustained best practice in beekeeping and apiculture acting as Centres of Excellence in the provision of on-site school apiaries and bee clubs.  Beacon schools will educate their pupils about the enjoyment and appreciation of beekeeping and increase awareness in young people of the importance of bees and other pollinating insects in the environment, plus sharing their knowledge not only with other schools but also with their local communities.  The aim is to establish a pool of schools with the required knowledge, experience and set up to provide support to others and to demonstrate the wide-ranging benefits to children keeping bees can bring. Beacon Schools should: Show sustained commitment to beekeeping with an on-site apiary registered on BeeBase Follow an established curriculum related to beekeeping Provide a beekeeping resource centre for other schools Be…

  • Project: Bees in Schools
    on June 14, 2021 at 1:49 pm

    Free Trees for Schools and Communities Scheme The Woodland Trust is a partner of the QGC and their Free Trees for Schools and Communities Scheme is a great way to get involved with tree planting. Across 2021 and 2022 they have over three million saplings in tree packs, available on a first come first served basis. Information on how to apply for the free saplings will be available through the Woodland Trust website  from June 2021.  https://queensgreencanopy.org/get-involved/communities-and-groups/ Beekeeping can be of huge benefit to your school Yvonne Kilvington, of Ashbrow School in Huddersfield, beekeeper and school employee has kept bees onsite for the last 7 years. Her children; I can remember one young man who’s confidence in the classroom was pretty low, but by spending time outside with the bees, over a number of weeks, his confidence went through the roof and had an huge impact on his work inside school. He felt good about himself as h…

  • Pests and diseases
    on June 14, 2021 at 8:29 am

    Varroa  Research led by Samuel D. Ramsey:  Varroa destructor feeds primarily on honey bee fat body tissue and not hemolymph https://www.pnas.org/content/116/5/1792 explains: Varroa destructor causes considerable damage to honey bees and subsequently the field of apiculture through just one process: feeding. For five decades, we have believed that these mites consume hemolymph like a tick consumes blood, and that Varroa cause harm primarily by vectoring viruses. Our work shows that they cause damage more directly. Varroa externally digest and consume fat body tissue rather than blood.  That’s Varroa. You must be able to manage varroa in your bees, if you want to be a beekeeper. Keeping bees is like keeping other animals. Beekeepers are responsible for their well-being and must be aware of how to keep them healthy. There are many diseases of honey bees. Some of these are ‘notifiable’, like other livest…

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  • Survey on how training and information sources for beekeepers and bee farmers can be improved now closed
    on April 20, 2021 at 12:00 am

    With thanks to those of you who have already responded. Gyda diolch i’r rhai ohonoch sydd eisoes wedi ymateb. Defra and the Welsh Government want to ensure that beekeepers and bee farmers have access to training and information that can help them implement effective biosecurity and maintain good standards of husbandry, so as to minimise pest and disease risks and improve the sustainability of honeybee populations.A questionnaire was available for current beekeepers, people who have recently stopped keeping bees as well as bee farmers to give their views and opinions on the type, accessibility and range of training and information available and how it could be improved. The survey closed on 21 April

  • Seasonal Bee Inspector (SBI) Vacancies
    on April 19, 2021 at 12:00 am

    The National Bee Unit currently has a number of Seasonal Bee Inspector (SBI) vacancies advertised in the following areas South Kent & East Sussex, South West Devon and South East Wales If you are interested in applying for the job, full details can be found on Civil Service Jobs.

  • Reporting Varroa
    on April 12, 2021 at 12:00 am

    Amendments to the Bee Diseases and Pests Control (England) Order 2006, the Bees Diseases and Pest Control (Scotland) Order 2007 and the Bee Diseases and Pests Control (Wales) Order 2006 come into force on the 21st of April 2021 requiring all beekeepers and/or officials in GB to report the presence of Varroa in any of the hives that they manage. This amendment will allow Great Britain to comply with the Animal Health Law which is necessary for future working relationships with the European Union.To make this simple, a tick box will be introduced to BeeBase, the voluntary register for beekeepers managed by the National Bee Unit. This will be the easiest way to report Varroa but an alternative mechanism will be provided for those who do not wish to register on the BeeBase system. Details of this alternative system will be provided after 21st April. If Scottish Beekeepers wish to, they can report varroa by contacting the Scottish Bee Health Inspectors (BeesMailbox@gov.scot).Although Varroa is known to be widespread, it continues to be one of the most serious pests faced by beekeepers. Reporting Varroa will contribute to the overall pest and disease surveillance work of the National Bee Unit and the Scottish Bee Health Inspectorate. We are grateful for your assistance with this new simple measure.No action will be required until after 21st April.

  • 2020 Hive Count
    on March 29, 2021 at 12:00 am

    More than 10,000 beekeepers, a record number, updated their details on BeeBase during this year’s hive count. There are currently more than 44,000 beekeepers registered on BeeBase, meaning that around 23% participated.This year’s hive count produced a figure of 260,268 colonies in the UK. This is slightly lower than the 2019 figure of 263,896. It is necessary to make a number of assumptions in the calculation, and so the figure is classed as an experimental statistic.The Hive Count provides a very useful indication of the number of managed colonies in the UK, and helps to ensure that BeeBase records are kept up to date. Information about numbers and location of hives is very important for National Bee Unit inspectors in terms of preparing and planning for outbreaks of disease and exotic pests.Thank you very much to everyone who has taken time to ensure that their BeeBase information is up to date.

  • How can training and information sources for beekeepers and bee farmers be improved? Have your say by taking our survey.
    on March 24, 2021 at 12:00 am

    Defra and the Welsh Government want to ensure that beekeepers and bee farmers have access to training and information that can help them implement effective biosecurity and maintain good standards of husbandry, so as to minimise pest and disease risks and improve the sustainability of honeybee populations.A short questionnaire was available for current beekeepers, people who have recently stopped keeping bees as well as bee farmers to give their views and opinions on the type, accessibility and range of training and information available and how it could be improved.   It took no more than 15 minutes to complete.Please encourage beekeepers and bee farmers to complete the survey.***This survey closed on 21 April 2021***

Beekeeping Forum

BIBBA Bee Improvement and Bee Breeders Association

  • BIBBA Monthly – June 2021
    by Robert Silver on June 16, 2021 at 7:45 am

    The Scillonian Honey Bee Project The Scillonian Honey Bee Project is the brainchild of Nick Bentham-Green. Nick is the Chair of B4 (Bring Back Black Bees) and a former Chair of BIBBA (Bee Improvement and Bee Breeders’ Association). The Project will run for between 5 and 10 years and will… The post BIBBA Monthly – June 2021 appeared first on BIBBA.

  • Bee Improvement Days 2021
    by Richard Senior on June 7, 2021 at 4:03 pm

    Bee Improvement Days 2021 The Bee Improvement and Bee Breeders’ Association (BIBBA) will be running a small number of practical and theoretical courses during the summer months. These will be aimed at beekeepers who wish to improve their bees, with emphasis on suitability to the environment, docility, calmness on the… The post Bee Improvement Days 2021 appeared first on BIBBA.

  • North Devon Bee Improvement Group-EX32
    by BHoldcroft2961 on May 23, 2021 at 6:59 pm

    North Devon Group operating from an apiary on the outskirts of Barnstaple as part of the North Devon Beekeepers Association The post North Devon Bee Improvement Group-EX32 appeared first on BIBBA.

  • Boughton Estate Bee Improvement Group-NN14
    by BHoldcroft2961 on May 23, 2021 at 5:08 pm

    A conservation project working with Free Living and managed surviving non treatment colonies to protect a wild population and produce a better local Honey Bee in Northamptonshire. The post Boughton Estate Bee Improvement Group-NN14 appeared first on BIBBA.

  • NatBIP News No5
    by Richard Senior on May 23, 2021 at 1:40 pm

    A project on the Scilly Isles Questions and Answers The post NatBIP News No5 appeared first on BIBBA.

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